And life goes on……..

Well we woke up this morning and not much has changed since the dreaded downgrade. I didn’t smell any smoke or hear any sirens and/or rioting, thank God!

It should now be apparent to just about every normal American that we are in a long slide into a new way of life. It’s too early to tell just how it’s going to settle out but it’s not going to be the same. On the bright side, we’re witnessing a milestone in US history. It is interesting to me how a generation of people that were born into a major economic depression, retired at 62 and lived successfully on pensions  are now leaving us during another possibly worse economic mess.

We spent the last few days reading the reactions and predictions of the “financial experts”. I did hear a few things that rang true in my opinion. Listening to Glenn Beck on Monday he said “prepare for impact”. What a perfect phrase for concluding what I’ve felt since the beginning of this mess…. the people calling the shots with our economy are just simply trying to “land” this crippled plane as softly as possible. Some may argue that the opposite is true and they’re trying to purposely crash the plane.

There was also some mention of localized use of foreign currency. As I understand things, this practice is very common and we mentioned before that  areas of the country could begin using Canadian money if the US dollar collapsed. Canadian currency was specifically mentioned by a few analysts over the weekend.

I believe that the one thing we can count on is that there will always be an economy.

After the dust settles, humans everywhere will go back to trading something they own for something they don’t own. This is the one fact that anti-capitalists cannot deny.

 

I also believe that we all need to start thinking now about how we’re going to support our households AND contribute to an economy. It may sound attractive to head to the hills and live solely off the land but in reality that is next to impossible and I’m not convinced that this crisis will knock technology back into the 18th century.

The slow pace at which this is playing out is destined to drain almost everyone’s preps. Potential inflation could make it almost impossible to replace all of the items being consumed. Taxes and utility bills will still need to be paid in the current US dollar amounts but any loans that are fixed will not be adjusted for inflation. Having a marketable skill or small-scale manufacturing equipment could make things much easier for you to participate and succeed in what eventually emerges as the new economy of the future. (I’ve read that mink ranches did very well during the Great Depression).

Lastly, it’s not too late to stockpile a decade’s worth or more of non-perishable consumables, if you have the means to do so. We’ve been picking up shoes, clothes and other goods now before prices inflate further. Consider buying in larger bulk quantities than you may already be. Use Amazon and ebay to your advantage and with some patience you can score some better-than-wholesale deals. For example,  here’s a good buy:
Twin-Blade Disposable Razor Case of 500
For under $75.00, my wife and I can get enough disposable razors today to conservatively last us almost 14 years! There are many deals like this (or better) available on the web if you look.

 

This crisis could take decades to clear up. One thing’s for sure, nobody knows what the true outcome will be. There are some predicting the end is here and there are some saying everything will be normal in 3-4 years. I guess I’ve come to the conclusion that the truth is most often found in the middle of two extremes.

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